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by: Angela Santomero | Filed under Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, Kids

Want a signed copy of Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood “Nighttime in the Neighborhood”? Nighttime in the Neighborhood

To celebrate Halloween, you can win a signed copy of the Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood book!!

To Enter:

  1.  Simply LIKE my Facebook page  (If you already have, thank you & jump to #2)

  2.  Tweet a costumed photo of your child over to me on twitter @AngelasClues with “@AngelasClues Halloween Giveaway” somewhere in the tweet by Wednesday Nov 2

I’ll sign a copy of the Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood story, Nighttime in the Neighborhood” for the winner and post their winning photo on my site (winner chosen on midnight Tuesday 11-2).

By entering this contest, you agree to have your photo posted on AngelasClues.com.

All decision making will be final & entirely up to the discretion of our Fearless Judges: Mr. Willy Wonka & Miss Veruca Salt.

Good luck & have a Boo-tiful Halloween!

xo

Angela

Just in time, towards the end of our presidential election, the first Wishenpoof Music Video debuted this week, and as the lyrics state,

It all comes down to me, to be the best person that I can be.  I need to…Believe in Me.”

It dawned on me today that these lyrics underscore my entire career and why I create positive media for kids.  I want to give them the skills and the encouragement to change the world, and nourish them against the bad modeling that surrounds them on a daily basis, that goes beyond election time. AAP

Last week, The American Academy of Pediatrics, retracted it’s guidelines for toddlers & screen time saying it’s all about content, context and co-viewing.  The idea that the “interaction” of live video chat has a potentially positive effect even on babies, plays to my strength in the value of creating media that actively involves the home viewer to think along, sing-along, learn-along and master the skills we put on the screen.  If babies are benefiting from this type of interaction, imagine what we are doing for older kids when we create media that is specifically for them, that asks them to play along? In fact, according to Linebarger and Walker (“Infants’ and Toddlers’ Television Viewing and Language Outcomes”, 2005), “The recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics (1999) urging parents to avoid TV for children younger than 2 years old may be premature. The authors go on to state not only do these results further provide evidence that “television matters” (e.g., Anderson et al., 2001; Wright et al., 2001), it’s the interactive format that is the tipping point.  Formats such as “speaking directly to the viewer, providing opportunities to respond, and using and defining vocabulary words”.  Blue's CLuesThe interactive and participatory nature of all my shows, starting in 1996 with “Blue’s Clues” (Nick Jr), where Steve or Joe speak directly to the child were positively related to “expressive language production and vocabulary”, according to Linebarger.  Another Blue’s Clues study by my mentor, Dr. Dan Anderson, et al, has purported that regular viewers of Blue’s Clues benefit from a strengthened cognitive development,  Anderson states, “Blue’s Clues doesn’t only do well, but does good.”

By now, we can’t argue that kids do, in fact, learn from media, good and bad.  As the AAP states, it is all about content.   What we need to look for is the type of content that has the intent to teach – kind of like looking for “organic produce” or checking the labels of food to see what is exactly in there.  If you could “check the labels” of media, we want to look for the shows that are founded in curriculum, that does research, that understands what is put on the screen has enormous impact on the brains of the next generation. I guess because I’m such a research nerd, I’m more proud of the research and learning that has come out of each of my shows than the Peabody wins or Emmy nominations. Super Why, our long running PBS Kids show is grounded in what the National Reading Panel deems critical to reading success, and has thus been proven to teach kids to read.   The Annenberg study, which was headed by Deborah L. Linebarger, Ph.D., Director of the Annenberg Children’s Media Lab, determined whether young viewers learned the key early literacy content in the show, such as letter names and sounds, rhyming, and matching spoken words to print and whether they applied their learning in their daily lives.  Dr. Linebarger has said, “The format of Super Why! provides kids with an engaging platform that fosters literacy skills, resulting in learning the content featured in the program as well as applying that content to other contexts.”

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by: Angela Santomero | Filed under Blue's Clues, My Projects
Today was no ordinary day.

Today I heard from an old friend..Blue’s Clues’ SIDE TABLE DRAWER, also known as Aleisha LaNae’ Allen, M.S.!!

Throughout the years in kids’ media, we’re involved in so many interactions with actors, artists and all types of creatives. But when you reconnect with them down the road, and see where their lives have taken them..there’s nothing better!
 Here’s a kind note from Aleisha, who has apparently moved on from simply holding Steve/Joe’s notebook.
 Side Table Drawer Blue's Clues

Hello Angela,

My name is Aleisha L. Allen; I was the voice of Side Table Drawer for the Blue’s Clues Series! I hope all is well! 

I wanted to reach out to you because I graduated from Teachers College (Columbia University) this past May with an M.S. in Communication Science and Disorders (CSD)- Speech Language Pathology. Shortly after, I found out that you, too, attended TC! Similarly, we both studied subjects regarding Childhood Development!  

It was such a pleasure to be THE Side Table Drawer and always be there for Steve when he needed his “Handy Dandy Notebook”. It was one of my first reccurring roles, and one that is my favorite, as well as the favorite of so many. So, I owe you a HUGE “Thank You!”.    🙂

As a recent graduate, I am aiming to resume my acting, particularly voice overs, as well as culminate what I’ve learned about Childhood Language Development and talents to be innovative! The goal with having my degree is to bridge both of my careers in order to provide effective services for individuals with communication disorders.

Again, thank you so much. Congratulations on your successes and innovations, and I hope to hear from you soon.

 Screenshot 2016-06-17 11.42.49

Best Always!

Aleisha

Thanks so very much, for taking the time to reach out and say “Hi”, my friend, Side Table Drawer
xo
Angela

 

by: Angela Santomero | Filed under Conferences, Creative Galaxy, Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood

This year at Kidscreen Summit I feel like I’m back in Kansas! I’ve seen so many familiar faces from my travels within the kids entertainment biz. This year the summit is taking place down south in Miami, FL.

Kidscreen Summit is renowned as the kids entertainment industry’s most important annual event. In 2015, the conference welcomed just over 1,700 attendees from 54 countries.

On Thursday, February 11 at 2:15 pm, I’ll be stepping away from Final Draft and jumping into game mode for Kidscreen’s 20th Anniversary Trivia Challenge!Screenshot 2016-02-10 22.25.24

Who else should host The Trivia Challenge, but none other than my friend, David Kleeman. He will test players from the industry, as well as myself, quizzing them on the past couple decades of industry news.

Joining me up on stage will be Daniel Bays (Creator, Writer & Showrunner BBC), Andrew Kavanagh (CEO & Founder Kavaleer Productions), Flavio Medeiros (Director of Programming & Acquisitions Discovery Kids Latin America), Adina Pitt VP, Content Acquisitions & Co-Productions Cartoon Network) and Dave Skwarczek (Executive Producer Eat Your Lunch).

Kidscreen’s 20th Anniversary Trivia Challenge promises to be a fun and tidbit filled session, so come on over if you’re attending Kidscreen in Miami!

 

“Don’t leave without coming to this! You could be on our audience team & compete for free KSS17 registration!”@davidkleeman

by: Angela Santomero | Filed under Parenting

 

There’s been an inevitable outpouring of love and support following the passing of the legendary David Bowie. One post in particular struck a cord for me. Samantha Schnurr wrote her eloquent story for E! about Director Cameron Crowe’s 6 month long interview with David Bowie. The director was only 16 at the time and his story had served as the backdrop for Almost Famous (2000).

Crowes’s grasp of and appreciation for Bowie’s creativity is well presented in Schnurr’s piece:

 “David Bowie’s impact is so huge in that he presents himself now as a role model to artists that may need to remember that it’s not about branding. It’s about a restless need to be creative and to continue being creative,” Cameron Crowe said. “For a young musician or artist of any kind, anybody coming up, it’s great to look to Bowie and see that seismic effect he’s had on people, not because he kept doing the same thing that worked again and again, but because he always shook it up and he always served the gods of creativity.”

There was such an impact from Bowie’s artistry because he was the real deal. He did what he did not to be a YouTube sensation or to get the most likes. He was a true creative and we were all lucky enough to share some time here together.

Creatives NEED to create. So if you know a creative, give them the one thing they truly need to express themselves..your support.

RIP